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Sequester Facts
Florida Impact
  • Schools: Florida will lose approximately $54.5 million in funding for primary and secondary education, putting around 750 teacher and aide jobs at risk.
  • Emergency Response: FEMA would need to reduce funding for State and local grants that support firefighter positions and State and local emergency management personnel, hampering ability to respond to natural disasters.
  • Aviation Security: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) would reduce its frontline workforce, which would substantially increase passenger wait times at airport security checkpoints.
  • Air Safety: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) would be forced to undergo a funding cut of more than $600 million.
  • Safety: The FBI and other law enforcement entities would see a reduction in capacity equivalent to more than 1,000 Federal agents.
  • Nutrition for Seniors: Florida would lose approximately $3.8 million in funds that provide meals for seniors.
  • Domestic Violence: Florida could lose up to $404,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 1,500 fewer victims being served.
  • Public Health: Florida will lose approximately $1.8 million in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats. In addition, Florida will lose about $5 million in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse.
  • Military: In Florida, approximately 31,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed, reducing gross pay by around $183.2 million in total.
  • Clean Air/Water: Florida would lose about $5.2 million in environmental funding to ensure clean water and air quality, as well as prevent pollution from pesticides and hazardous waste. In addition, Florida could lose another $1.1 million in grants for fish and wildlife protection.
  • Head Start: Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 2,700 children in Florida, reducing access to critical early education.
  • College Students: Around 6,250 fewer low income students in Florida would receive aid to help them finance the costs of college and around 1,700 fewer students will get work-study jobs that help them pay for college.
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